Sample Final Exam

English 122

This final exam will be in two parts. You need to pass both parts to pass the course. If you fail the exam, you will be given an incomplete and allowed to meet with the instructor to develop an alternative plan.

Part One: Write a one paragraph summary of the article that was assigned prior to final week. In your summary, you must include a topic sentence, sub-points, transitions, author introductions, in-text citations, and correct paraphrasing of supporting data. You must also write with a minimum of surface errors. A passing paragraph will show some competence (score of average on the scoring sheet) in all the above areas.

Part Two: Item analysis will be done on the following section. If 50% of the class does not get the question right, the question will be thrown out of the scoring. Of the remaining questions, students must score 70% to pass.

Disclosure: The statements used in this exam to illustrate logical formats or fallacies are not necessarily the opinion of the instructor and are used for educational purposes with no intention of slandering any minority, ethnic group or gender.

For practice, use the form available from the instructor to answer the following questions. She can then use the scantron to score your practice run and then you can compare answers. If you have additional questions, see the instructor. You may also wish to review the terms in the "Snow Lecture" section of this web page.

In the following questions, identify whether the statement is a report(fact), an inference, an assumption, or a value judgement. Note: inference and assumption will not be choices in any particular question.

1. Everyone has worn a pair of jeans at sometime or other.

a. fact/report

b. assumption

c. value judgement

d. none of the above

2. Ashley's hair is dripping on her yellow rain slicker; therefore it must be raining.
a. fact/report

b. inference

c. value judgement

d. none of the above

3. Rock music is evil.
a. fact/report

b. inference

c. value judgement

d. none of the above

4. President Clinton was the best president the U.S. has ever had.
a. fact/report

b. assumption

c. value judgement

d. none of the above

5. Pork comes from pigs.
a. fact/report

b. assumption

c. value judgement

d. none of the above

6. I saw Sally at a bar. She must be an alcoholic.
a. fact/report

b. assumption

c. value judgement

d. none of the above

7. The Minnesota senate and house finally compromised on a tax refund, just the week before the legislature needed to adjourn. (Session during 2000)
a. fact/report

b. assumption

c. value judgement

d. none of the above

For the following examples, identify the kind of reasoning that is used. Note: the reasoning does not have to be valid.

8. Women are bad drivers.

a. Inductive generalization

b. Values reasoning

c. Reasoning by analogy

d. Opinion, not reasoning.

9. Junk food is high in fat.
a. Inductive generalization

b. Deduction

c. Reasoning by analogy

d. Opinion, not reasoning.

10. Solving the problem of crime with the death penalty is like using euthanasia to solve the problem of the high costs of public health. We wouldn't consider the second option, so why would we consider the first.
a. Hypothetical reasoning/ best explanation

b. Values reasoning

c. Reasoning by analogy

d. Opinion, not reasoning.

11. God is love; love is blind; I am blind; therefore, I am God.
a. Inductive generalization

b. Deduction

c. Reasoning by analogy

d. Opinion, not reasoning.

12. All models in this month's teen magazines are wearing pink. Pink is the latest trend.
a. Inductive generalization

b. Deductive reasoning

c. Reasoning by analogy

d. Opinion, not reasoning.

13. All mammals are warm-blooded animals. Dogs are mammals. Therefore Dogs are warm-blooded.
a. Hypothetical reasoning/Best explanation

b. Deduction

c. Reasoning by analogy

d. Opinion, not reasoning.

14. All elephants have trunks. George is an elephants. Therefore, George has a trunk.
a. Hypothetical reasoning/Best explanation

b. Deduction

c. Reasoning by analogy

d. Opinion, not reasoning.

For the following examples, identify which logical fallacy is the most obvious classification.

Explain your reasoning, if you think two answers could be correct.

15. I walked under a ladder today. That's probably why I got in a car accident.

a. Post hoc

b. Argument to ignorance.

c. Unqualified generalization.

d. Either/or fallacy.

e. None of the above

16. All women like to cook
a. Unqualified generalization

b. Slippery Slope

c. Ad Hominem

d. Appeal to authority

e. Not a fallacy.

17. The unreported number of child abuse cases is twice the reported number.
a. Unqualified generalization

b. Slippery Slope

c. Unknowable statistic

d. Appeal to pity

e. Not a fallacy.

18. Ventura is the best candidate for governor because I voted for him.
a. Argument in a circle

b. Argument to the people/bandwagon

c. Hasty generalization

d. Hidden generalization/enthymeme.

e. None of the above

19. Critics of Clinton state that he was not a good president because he smoked marijuana (without inhaling) while in college, so he's a pothead. This charge can be classed as which type of fallacy?
a. Argument to age.

b. Slippery slope\

c. Ad Hominem/personal attack

d. Appeal to authority

e. Not a fallacy

20. Of course Grandfather Bob is good with his hands. He's a man.
a. Argument to the people/bandwagon

b. Extrapolation

c. Argument to age

d. Hidden generalization/enthymeme

e. not an argument

21. All men who wear hats are cocky.
a. Argument to age

b. Unqualified generalization

c. Begging the Question

d. Either/or fallacy

e. Post Hoc

22. Little Tommy likes to climb trees, so all boys like to climb trees.
a. Extrapolation

b. Hidden generalization/enthymeme

c. Post Hoc

d. Hasty generalization

e. Not a fallacy

23. Either I study for my exam or I will fail. I didn't study, so I will fail.
a. Argument in a circle

b. Post Hoc

c. Argument to ignorance

d. Either/or fallacy

e. None of the above

24. Mom, all my friends are going to the swing dance in Litchfield, so I should be able to go too.
a. Argument to age

b. Argument to ignorance

c. Slippery Slope

d. Argument to authority

e. Argument to the people/bandwagon

25. Lawrence Uzell, a senior administrative appointee to the U.S. Department of Education, equated increased help to the handicapped to the declining Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores nationally. (Reported in Christian Science Monitor, 5-14-86).
a. Argument to the people/bandwagon

b. Argument in a circle

c. False analogy

d. Appeal to Authority

e. Not a fallacy